Going through recovery is a process. Few, if any, individuals realize that they have a problem, need to get help, and quit using all in one day or overnight.  Recovery is ongoing; it can begin at any time, but it is something that addicted people need to work on, from that point forward, every day for the rest of their lives.

There are several clear and specific stages that all people on the path to recovery go through.  Each stage takes a different length of time for each person – there is no real normal; the progression forward is different for all.  The stages of recovery are linear, certainly, but it is very easy to move backwards on the path as well, if one is not very careful and aware.  Some of the stages occur prior to cessation, whereas others are more of what people tend to think of as true recovery, but all of the steps play an important role in the journey to a clear, sober, and healthy life.

Changing for Good

The stages of addiction recovery may seem to be common sense.  However, these stages were articulated most clearly in Changing for Good, a book first published in 1994.  This book was written by three psychologists, Dr. James O. Prochaska, Ph.D, of the University of Rhode Island, Dr. John C. Norcross, Ph.D, of the University of Scranton, and Dr. Carlo C. DiClemente, Ph.D, of the University of Maryland, all of whom have worked extensively with individuals who have looked to change their own behaviors.  This book isn’t strictly about addiction recovery, although it is certainly one focus; it is about change in general and human behavior.  These three doctors spent time working with people with all sorts of bad habits: addiction, alcohol abuse, overeating, smoking, and attraction to toxic relationships.  Through their work, they began to see a pattern in the ways people begin to recognize their own problems, and the stages and steps they pass through while trying to change and find a better life through giving up their undesirable and often dangerous habits.   Since initial publication, the stages described in the book have become well known and widely accepted by addiction recovery professionals, and are understood by many moving forward on their recovery journey.

Stage One: Pre-contemplation, Awareness & Early Acknowledgment

Although stage one doesn’t outwardly look like actual recovery, everyone who wants to make a change has to start somewhere.  In this stage, the user begins to realize that his or her drug or alcohol abuse has repercussions of some sort, but he or she is not really too worried about it yet.  Although problems may have begun to emerge at work, health issues may have become noticeable, relationships may have become strained, or financial difficulties may have become apparent due to using, the user still feels that he or she is still in control.  In this stage, the individual may try to rationalize his or her choices, and feels that the benefits still outweigh the challenges when it comes to using.  However, at the same time, the user has begun to notice some issues, and as a result, this is where the recovery seed is planted.  Starting here, a slow shift from denial to willingness to make a change may emerge, and the user may begin to realize that action is needed to make that change.

Stage Two:  Contemplation

The second stage is another step on the journey, but it too, is still a far cry from living a clean and sober lifestyle. At this point, the user has become more aware of the repercussions of his or her drug and alcohol abuse, but is still unwilling to quit most of the time.  He or she may consider quitting “someday,” but still looks at it as something off in the future.  But, as time goes on, he or she will likely begin to see how others are effected by his or her behaviors, and the user will likely experience a shift in thought, and begin to move forward from awareness onward more and more towards action.  Although a user in stage two is not actively pursuing recovery yet, the individual is getting closer.

Stage Three: Preparation

Stage three is a big step on the road to recovery.  At this point, the individual realizes that the responsibility for their choices lies within themselves, and that change is up to them.  As a result, the person may begin to gather resources about detoxing, rehabilitation, and recovery.  He or she may speak to friends or family members who have been down the same path.   Realizing that they have a problem, the individual may attempt abstinence here and there independently; denial is over at this point.  The user may even go as far as to make a verbal or written commitment to sobriety, and may attend a support group for the first time.  Many experts feel that it is in this stage that recovery actually begins, and a decision may be made to go to treatment by the end of stage three.

Stage Four:  Action / Early Recovery

Stage four is the beginning of what most people view as the actual recovery process.  According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 23.5 million people in the United States aged twelve or older needed treatment for a drug or alcohol abuse problem in 2009.  However, only 2.6 million – 11.2 percent of those who needed treatment actually sought it.  In stage four, the user actively seeks out treatment.  He or she will at this point become completely immersed in the addiction recovery process, and will begin to practice complete abstinence.  This is a very challenging time period, and is a time of both great significance and significant risk for the individual.  He or she will be very vulnerable during this time of massive change; the person seeking treatment may have to give up old friends, may enter a residential treatment facility or move to be closer to support, and will have to abandon old places, activities and behaviors while attempting to establish a new, drug free life.   On top of all of this, he or she will have to develop new coping skills, and may further be working to rebuild relationships and other aspects of life that were damaged during active addiction.   Relapse is common during this time period, as individuals will not yet have developed the skills to avoid it, but despite small failures and setbacks, the user is well on his or her way to a healthier, more sustainable lifestyle.

Stage Five: Maintenance

Reaching stage five is the goal of all on the path to recovery.  Although former users will always be addicted to their drug of choice or alcohol, at this point, they are feeling strong in their sobriety.  They are able to sustain healthier lifestyle patterns, and are well aware of triggers and stressors that can lead to relapse – and know how to deal with them when they arise.  Recovery is still not easy, but is much, much easier than when they began on this journey, and the recovering individual realizes that he or she will have to work at this for the rest of his or her life.  However, if they have made it this far, they are beginning to live a life they could not have imagined at the beginning of their recovery journey, and have truly gone through a complete transformation in body, mind, and spirit.

None of these stages are easy – not even the last one – but each is a vital part of the path to recovery.  Although it may seem like one or more of these stages is taking forever, users wishing to change their lives must realize that this process takes time, and must continue to keep their eye on the prize at the end – a healthier, longer, more stable life, free of alcohol and drugs.